Body

13 Postures – Ka’el Bey

INTRODUCTION

Wow, is not the chart that Babo Bey created fantastic? This piece of functional art is a true masterpiece. It illustrates a 13 postures series with breathing ques. 13 Postures is based on Hatha Yoga’s Sun Salutation. The sun salutation is an ancient exercise that people today can add to their fitness regime. The instructions are already laid in the chart. That being said, the following information is necessary for further clarification on the sequence, essence, and will provide further understanding of the 13 Postures.

SEQUENCE

The sequence is obviously illustrated by the chart. The first position (also called Tadasana) is the beginning and the ending. The following information will help clarify how the body is aligned during each posture. In general, you will face the direction of the sunrise, or symbolically face the East. Imagine that someone is pulling the crown of your head up to the sky with a string. As you practice, follow these ques for each step to enhance your muscle memory.

  1. Stand erect with big toes touching, palms facing forward, shoulders down
  2. Bring hands to heart center. Press palms together, broaden the chest
  3. Reach up to the sky, look up (you may add a slight back bend here)
  4. Bend forward, look toward the knees
  5. RIGHT leg steps back, open the heart
  6. Step back to plank pose, shoulders and directly above the wrists
  7. Knees, chin, and chest touch the mat (continue exhaling)
  8. Slide through to cobra pose, shoulders back
  9. Push up and back into mountain pose, equal weight distribution between hands and feet
  10. Step forward with RIGHT leg into the low lunge, push chest forward
  11. Step to the front of the mat, bring big toes to touch, look toward the knees
  12. Rise up and reach for the sky
  13. Bring the hands to heart center and push the crown toward the sky

After completing the sequence, repeat the same series for the left side.

  1. Stand erect with big toes touching, palms facing forward, shoulders down
  2. Bring hands to heart center. Press palms together, broaden the chest
  3. Reach up to the sky, look up (you may add a slight back bend here)
  4. Bend forward, look toward the knees
  5. LEFT leg steps back, open the heart
  6. Step back to plank pose, shoulders and directly above the wrists
  7. Knees, chin, and chest touch the mat (continue exhaling)
  8. Slide through to cobra pose, shoulders back
  9. Push up and back into mountain pose, equal weight distribution between hands and feet
  10. Step forward with LEFT leg into the low lunge, push chest forward
  11. Step to the front of the mat, bring big toes to touch, look toward the knees
  12. Rise up and reach for the sky
  13. Bring the hands to heart center and push the crown toward the sky

When the sequence is practiced on the right side and the left side, it equals one round of sun salutation. The purpose of practicing the sequence on both sides is to promote balance. This is the essence of Hatha Yoga.

Watch this video so you can see how the sequence flows. Notice how I start slowly and gradually build momentum.

https://youtu.be/RqQBr9dUEsA

ESSENCE

The essence of Hatha yoga entails balance through mindfulness and breathing.

Hatha means Sun and Moon. Ha means Sun and Tha means moon. The goal of Hatha yoga is to balance the sun and moon which are the masculine and feminine energies respectively. The right side body corresponds with masculinity, and the left side of the body deals with femininity. These energies weave themselves together along the spinal column and corpus callosum of the brain.

In yoga, this central energy channel is known as the Sushumna Nadi. The masculine wave of energy is called the Pingala Nadi and the feminine is called the Ida Nadi. The process of balancing these energies and raising your consciousness is known as Kundalini. The sun salutation effectively balances and raises the kundalini.

Along the way, there will be distractions and obstacles that manifest. The masculine brain will insist on counting the number of salutations and possibly get lost in the sequence. The feminine side may get distracted by the imagination. When these things happen, do not be discouraged. Let them be reminders to breathe and let go.Take note of these thoughts and feelings as an observer, rather than a victim. Practice self-awareness. This practice is also known as mindfulness.

To achieve a balanced state of mind, breathing is essential. The type of breath that is used in Hatha yoga is called Ujii. At first it is important to memorize the sequence. Pairing the movements with the breath will help you internalize the order and rhythm. Once that is accomplished, emphasis should be put on how to breathe and how to move. The inhale should fill up the abdominal, thoracic, and clavicle cavities through the nostrils. The exhale involves constructing the diaphragm to produce a hissing sound. It is like fogging a mirror with your mouth closed. Adding this Ujii breathing into the practice will enhance the essence of Hatha yoga.

UNDERSTANDING

The 13 Postures are essentially the sun salutation of Hatha Yoga. When I studied Hatha yoga, I was taught that 12 was the magic number. Traditionally, the sun salutation is practiced twelve times on the right side and twelve times on the left side. The sequence starts with the right side, and alternates back and forth until all 12 rounds are completed for each side. I concluded that the reason for this emphasis on the number 12 was due to the masculine dominant energy in yogic philosophy.

Study any chart of the sun salutation. There are a wide variety of styles, yet none compare to the chart that Babo Bey created. Most charts will entail 12 postures or less. Babo and I have deliberately incorporated 13 postures to capture every movement. This ensures that the practitioner will return to Tadasana (1st posture) in between each cycle.

In Hatha yoga, every Asana, or pose, that is done on the right side will get repeated on the left side. For instance, if I balance on my right leg, I have to do the same for my left leg. In between every pose, the body should return to Tadasana to recalibrate. This will allow the body to internalize what happened during the last pose. It gives the yogi a chance to feel the subtle changes that are taking place after each Asana.

13 Postures offers the practitioner an accurate visual reference of the Hatha Sun Salutation. The chart ensures that the practitioner will return to Tadasana (1st posture) in between each cycle. Most charts do not detail this transition. I believe that emphasizing the number 12 can inaccurately depict the sequence taking place.Therefore, the understanding of Hatha yoga is not transliterated accurately to the student. Now that the sequence is illustrated correctly, for the record, everyone who uses 13 Postures will have proper insight and the highest understanding of the Hatha Sun Salutation.

CONCLUSION

The Sun Salutation is an ancient exercise that was passed down from teacher to student for many generations. 13 Postures has been created to illustrate the sequence of Hatha yoga’s sun salutation, continuing this tradition. By utilizing the 13 Postures chart created by Babo Bey, the practitioner can rest assured that they have the most accurate sequence, proper breathing, and true understanding of the Hatha Sun Salutation.


Source link
Tags
Back to top button
close
Thanks !

Thanks for sharing this, you are awesome !

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This

Share this post with your friends!

Close